TL:DR If you use Apple’s calendar client software, do not run the server on an IP and port shared with any other SSL/TLS services.

I run my own CalDAV calendar server for my family and for myself. For a very long time I used DAViCal, but it’s always been a slight annoyance to set up on Apple devices because they don’t like DAViCal’s https://example.com/davical/caldav.php/majid URLs. What’s more, recent versions of iCalendar would pop up password prompts at random, and after re-entering the password a couple of times (once is not enough), would finally go on and work. The various devices would also all too often get out of sync, sometimes with the inscrutable error:

Server responded with “500” to operation CalDAVAccountRefreshQueueableOperation

requiring deleting the calendar account and recreating it by hand.

I tried replacing DAViCal with Radicale today, with the same flaky user experience, and I finally figured out why: Apple uses at least a couple of daemons to manage calendar and sync, including dataaccessd, accountsd and remindd (also CalendarAgent depending on your OS version). It seems some or all of them do not implement Server Name Indication (SNI) consistently. SNI is the mechanism by which a TLS client indicates what server it is trying to connect to during the TLS handshake, so multiple servers can share the same IP address and port, and is an absolutely vital part of the modern web. For example many servers use Amazon Web Services' Elastic Load Balancer or CloudFront services, which are used by multiple clients, if Amazon had to dedicate a separate IP address for each, it would break their business model1.

Sometimes, those daemons will not use SNI, which means they will get your default server. In my case, it’s password-protected with a different password than the CalDAV one, which is what triggers the “enter password” dialog. At other times, they will call your CalDAV server with dubious URLs like /.well-known/caldav, /principals/, /dav/principals/, /caldav/v2 and if your server has a different HTTP password for that and sends back a HTTP 401 status code instead of a 404 Not Found, well, that will also trigger a reauthentication prompt.

Big Sur running on my M1 MacBook Air seems to be more consistent about using SNI, but will still poke around on those URLs, triggering the reauthentication prompts.

In other words, the only way to get and Apple-compatible calendar server running reliably is to dedicate an IP and port to it that is not shared with anything else. I only have one IP address at home where the server runs, and I run other vital services behind HTTPS, so I can’t dedicate 443 to a CalDAV server. Fortunately, the configuration will accept the syntax example.org:8443 to use a non-standard port (make sure you use the Advanced option, not Automatic), but this is incredibly sloppy of Apple.


  1. Amazon does in fact have a Legacy Clients Support option, but they charge a $600/month fee for that, and if you need more than two, they will demand written justification before approving your request. ↩︎